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DeAngelis, S. Thompson, and B. Thompson
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. – A Penn State Law professor, a State College attorney, and a recent Penn State Law graduate—who was a student when the piece was published—co-authored an article in the current issue of The Pennsylvania Bar Association Quarterly. “Antitrust Analysis of Pennsylvania Hospital Mergers and the Efficiency Defense” by Professor of Law Samuel C. Thompson Jr., his wife, attorney Becky Thompson, and 2018 Penn State Law graduate Theresa DeAngelis appears in Volume LXXXIX, No. 2, of the journal.
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. – A new paper by Penn State Law professor Samuel C. Thompson Jr. describes how certain types of businesses will be affected by the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCAJA), which was signed into law by President Donald Trump in December.
December 20 UPDATE: Thompson will follow up on the Curry v. Trump theme with a look at how the final legislation will affect both men in a letter to the editor to be published in Tax Notes Today on Dec. 21 and Tax Notes  on Jan. 1. Original Story:
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. – Penn State Law will host a live webinar from noon to 3:30 p.m. on January 19 featuring some of the country’s leading mergers and acquisitions attorneys examining how the new Trump Administration might impact the laws and regulations relating to mergers and acquisitions.
D v H | Penn State Law
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. – With Election Day less than a month away, Penn State Law professor Samuel C. Thompson Jr. will present three special lectures in October and November to provide voters with an overview of Hillary Clinton’s and Donald Trump’s varying economic policy proposals.
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. – Penn State Law professor Samuel C. Thompson Jr. testified on July 14 in a hearing jointly sponsored by the IRS and the U.S. Treasury Department at IRS headquarters in Washington, D.C. The hearing addressed the legality and scope of recent Treasury Department and IRS proposed regulations dealing with the distinction between debt and equity under Section 385 of the Internal Revenue Code. The regulations, which were issued in April, are designed, inter alia, to curtail corporate tax inversions.

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